The extent to which the scope of Project Moon Dust was continually expanded is shown by a telex that the National Defense Intelligence Service (DIA) sent to all American embassies and consulates around the world via the US State Department in 1973: It rejected the US – Diplomats to report “incidents involving the investigation of non-American space objects or objects of unknown origin” immediately using the code word “Moon Dust”. It was not until the first documents mentioning “Moon Dust” and “Blue Fly” came to the public in 1980, rather by accident, that the Air Force changed the code name.

Project Moon Dust

How secret the projects still are became apparent when the American UFO researcher Sgt. Clifford Stone tried in 1992 to get more information about “Moon Dust” and “Blue Fly” through US Senator Jeff Bingaman. “Fort Belvoir, Virginia, has no UFO department and never has,” Lt.Col replied. John E. Madison Jr. from the Department of Inquiries to Congress of the US Air Force Department to the Senator in November 1992, “and there is no Moon Dust Project or Operation Blue Fly.”

It was only when Senator Bingaman submitted the documents Stone had sent him that the Air Force “corrected” their position on April 14, 1993, admitting their existence, but claiming that they had been suspended “for lack of activity” in the meantime.

At 4:44 p.m. on December 9, 1965, thousands of people from northern Canada to Pennsylvania watched an orange ball of fire in the evening sky hurtling across the sky in a southeastern direction, followed by a trail of smoke. Pilots flying over Michigan, Ohio, or Ontario reported sightings of what they believed was a burning plane about to crash into Lake Erie. Yet it crossed the Great Lakes and Minnesota. When it reached Ohio, witnesses saw it pause in the sky for a few seconds and then change course eastward, to Pennsylvania. Exactly at 4:47 pm a Mrs. Jones from the town of Kecksburg called the radio station WHJB in Greensburg and told reporter John Murphy:

“A huge ball of fire fell into a wooded area, maybe two kilometers away from us.”

At 4:44 p.m. on December 9, 1965, thousands of people from northern Canada to Pennsylvania watched an orange ball of fire in the evening sky hurtling across the sky in a southeastern direction, followed by a trail of smoke. Pilots flying over Michigan, Ohio, or Ontario reported sightings of what they believed was a burning plane about to crash into Lake Erie.

Yet it crossed the Great Lakes and Minnesota. When it reached Ohio, witnesses saw it pause in the sky for a few seconds and then change course – eastward, to Pennsylvania. Exactly at 4:47 pm a Mrs. Jones from the town of Kecksburg called the radio station WHJB in Greensburg and told reporter John Murphy: “A huge ball of fire fell into a wooded area, maybe two kilometers away from us.”

What followed was a large-scale rescue operation. Whatever had crashed in the woods, all three branches of the armed forces marched, the army and state police blocked the wooded area, positioned armed guards on the forest paths and brought technical equipment to the crash site. Then the air force took over the nearby fire station of the volunteer fire brigade to set up a command post there.

While the firefighters were now prohibited from entering their station, they watched as uniformed men carried their equipment into it, including a large radio unit. A little later two large transport vehicles were seen, one of them press reports about the crash of an unidentified object in Kecksburg near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with military registration, which drove into the forest.

Around the same time, residents of nearby Latrobe Airport observed an Air Force jet landing, even though the airport had long been closed at the time. Soon dozens of reporters from nearby Pittsburgh arrived in Kecksburg and encountered a wall of silence. The only thing that a police spokesman let the journalists know said enough: “There is an unidentified flying object in the woods there.”

When they called Project Bluebook at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Major Hector Quintanilla explained that an Air Force investigative team was already in Kecksburg. Eyewitnesses later described the Airforce team, dressed in blue work suits and with blue berets on their heads: The “Blue Berets”, as the employees of “Operation Blue Fly” were also called, were in charge of the operation.

The recovery itself was carried out by the 662nd radar squadron, which was stationed in Oakdale near Pittsburg and, like Moon Dust, was under the Aerospace Defense Command, as was later officially confirmed.

What followed was strict censorship: the very next day the Luftwaffe told the press that it was just a meteorite that it had discovered and recovered in the forests of Kecksburg, but failed to give the find to scientists or the press present.

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